Image of the cards from the Spot It! game

Spot It! Game

My granddaughters (10 and 12) completely annihilated me while playing Spot It! during their post-Christmas visit .  My husband and I had no chance to react quick enough to those elusive figures.  

I don’t take this too seriously and I think it is really great that someone has invented a game that children can win without compromising the parent’s integrity or competitive spirit, however, I was very curious about why adults lose at Spot It! so easily.

I have a theory based on a tiny bit of experience and the book I am currently reading, “Reductionism in Art and Brain Science” by Eric R. Kandel, Nobel Prize Winner.  This is not a quick read, but it has some enlightening details on how the brain processes images.  

In grade school, we were shown a classical image of how our eye works.  The image comes into the eye upside down and the brain has to turn it around and figure out the image.  It turns out our brain has even more work to do, it has to take the image and make electrical signals related to forms and shapes and associate them with something we may have seen before, then interpret that into something we can understand.

These signals don’t all go to the same place in the brain, which even adds more complications.  There is a place in the brain that just handles faces.  There is place in the brain that takes care of shapes.  Shapes are easy, even babies recognize shapes, but more complex things require life experience and learning.

So back to “Spot It!,  it is my theory that younger children look at the shapes on the card and react quickly to what they see without going through the interpretation process.  So why do adults lose at Spot It!, because we have too much experience.  Our brain is spending too much time trying to figure out what the shape is, rather than reacting to the shape itself, then associating it with a name.  This makes us slow in reaction time.

If I had a way to turn off all the images I have experienced in life and go back to baby shapes, I think I could do much better, but alas, I don’t think retrograde my memories would be a very good idea.  

This all relates back to how people interpret art.  Art isn’t just someone looking at a picture and seeing what the artist portrayed, it is more of the artist had something in mind, but the beholder uses their life learning and experiences and interprets the image in a completely different way.  Essentially both the artist and the beholder are creators.  

So when you play Spot It! with your grandchildren next time ask them if they could give you a few free cards, just to even out the odds.

 

“Why do adults lose at “Spot It!, because we have too much experience.”

Nana Kate doing web research

Nana Kate

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